Rocket Fuel: How Astronauts Will Brew the Perfect Espresso in Space. Кофе iss


NASA - ISSpresso

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone Crew members on long-duration space missions frequently miss the comforts of home, from favorite meals to a fresh cup of coffee. ISSpresso is an espresso maker for the International Space Station (ISS) that crew members use to make tea, coffee, broth, or other hot beverages they might enjoy. Science Results for Everyone Information Pending

The following content was provided by David Avino, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.

Experiment Details

OpNom: ISSpresso

Principal Investigator(s) David Avino, Argotec, Torino, Italy

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s) Information Pending

Developer(s) Argotec, Torino, Italy

Sponsoring Space Agency National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization Italian Space Agency (ASI)

Research Benefits Earth Benefits, Space Exploration

ISS Expedition Duration March 2015 - March 2016; -

Expeditions Assigned 43/44,45/46,55/56

Previous Missions Information Pending

^ back to topExperiment Description

Research Overview

The ISSpresso provides:
  • Espresso,
  • Teas,
  • Consommé
  • Other hot beverages,
  • "A taste of home".

 

Description ISSpresso is an on board espresso maker that produces hot beverages, and consommé. Water at room temperature is heated and, under pressure, used to create an espresso for the crew member. The ISSpresso is not much larger than a typical espresso machine that would be found on the ground. 

^ back to topApplications

Space Applications ISSpresso is not much larger than a typical Earth-based espresso machine, and produces espresso, broth or tea. Water at room temperature is heated and pressurized to brew espresso, improving food options and variety for orbiting crew members.  

Earth Applications The technology developed to provide espresso, and other hot beverages, in a microgravity environment could lead to new or improved brewing methods and techniques in Earth-based applications.

^ back to topOperations

Operational Requirements and Protocols

The ISSpresso requires 120V DC power which is obtained at the Utility Outlet Panel (UOP) on the ISS.  Additionally, the ISSpresso requires use of a NASA standard drink bag that interfaces with the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) in the US LAB. A few minutes of crew time is required for each drink to brew.

ISSpresso is installed near a UOP that supplies 120V DC power. After ISSpresso is physically and electrically connected, a Water Pouch is installed, and the unit is powered on. In order to utilize the ISSpresso, a NASA standard drink bag is installed, along with a capsule containing the beverage item that the crew member wishes to drink. After the item has been brewed, the used capsule and the drink bag are removed. ISSpresso is then powered off, the Water Pouch removed. ISSpresso is then disconnected from the UOP, and it is removed and stowed.

^ back to topDecadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

^ back to topResults/More Information

Information Pending

^ back to top Related Websites

^ back to top

Imagery

NASA Image: ISS043E160068 - ESA Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti waits next to the newly installed ISSpresso machine. The espresso device allows crews to make tea, coffee, broth, or other hot beverages they might enjoy.

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NASA Image: ISS043E160076 - ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti is photographed next to the newly installed ISSpresso machine. + View Larger Image

NASA Image: ISS043E160241 - Image of the ISSpresso machine taken by the Expedition 43 crew. ISSpresso is an on board espresso maker that produces hot beverages and consommé.

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The ISSpresso machine. Image courtesy of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

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www.nasa.gov

How Astronauts Will Brew the Perfect Espresso in Space

Need a caffeine hit in space? For astronauts on the International Space Station, it will take less than two minutes to brew an espresso in a coffee machine slated for launch next year.

The so-called "ISSpresso" machine is expected to launch to the station aboard Orbital Sciences' fifth resupply flight using the Cygnus spacecraft and Antares rocket in early 2015. And once it's installed, astronauts will only need to push a button to get coffee.

While the machine is best known as an espresso maker, it's also possible to brew other types of coffee or even rehydrate food with the device, the co-manufacturer told Space.com. But it took 18 months of intensive work to get to this point. [Watch a video about the space station espresso machine]

"The design and the entire system was built from scratch, because [compared to] a regular coffee machine working on Earth, there are a lot of safety requirements," said David Avino, the managing director of engineering and software company Argotec. Lavazza, an Italian coffee maker, also participated in the design.

Avoiding burns

A prototype of Lavazza's and Argotec's "ISSpresso" produces fresh-brewed Italian espresso. A final version of the coffee machine will operate onboard the International Space Station.

A prototype of Lavazza's and Argotec's "ISSpresso" produces fresh-brewed Italian espresso. A final version of the coffee machine will operate onboard the International Space Station.

Credit: Lavazza/Argotec

Those requirements included finding a way to keep the hot water inside the machine after the espresso is finished. While water residue is normal in Earth-bound espresso machines, the prospect of boiling-hot bubbles seeping from the device in microgravity forced Argotec to seek a solution.

Argotec has kept its exact solution under wraps as the company applies for patents, but in general terms, a small container in the machine collects the water. Also, stainless steel has replaced the usual plastic tubing inside the device, making it more resistant of pressures of up to 400 bars.

Argotec partly bills the device as a tool for the astronauts, but also a way for the company to experiment with designs that could improve coffee drinkers' lives on Earth. Astronauts will be able to watch the foam being applied inside the machine, for example.

The company is also interested in how the coffee brewing performs in microgravity, as the makers haven't had the chance to test that out yet.

And we have brew-off

 The ISSpresso space coffee machine possesses dimensions of 17 by 16.5 by 14 inches (43 by 42 by 36 centimeters), and weighs in at 44 pounds (20 kilograms).

The ISSpresso space coffee machine possesses dimensions of 17 by 16.5 by 14 inches (43 by 42 by 36 centimeters), and weighs in at 44 pounds (20 kilograms).

Credit: Lavazza/Argotec

Astronauts can operate the device with only the push of a button. An astronaut will take a pouch of water from the station's room-temperature potable system, about 8.4 ounces' (250 milliliters) worth. Those who like sweet coffee can add a dash of sugar to the mix.

Next, crew members will select how much coffee they want, insert a capsule in the top of the machine and press "brew." It takes the device 60 seconds to heat the water to 167 degrees Fahrenheit (75 degrees Celsius), then 40 seconds to dispense the espresso.

The coffee will spew out into a pouch, ready for the astronaut to drink. And if there's a lineup, the company says the machine can easily make a second serving in the same time, about 40 seconds.

ISSpresso is in final testing right now, but if all goes to schedule it should be available on the International Space Station in time for the Expedition 42 flight of Samantha Cristoforetti, a European Space Agency astronaut from Italy. She is expected to go to space in November.

"How cool is that?" Cristoforetti wrote on Twitter. "I'll get to operate the first space espresso machine!"

Follow Elizabeth Howell @howellspace. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.

www.space.com

Cup of ISSpresso & other space novelties — RT World News

The first female Italian astronaut has taken the first coffee machine to space, so now the ISS crew can start their morning with a cup of espresso. Take a look at other devices that make life in Earth's orbit more fun.

READ MORE: New international crew delivered safely to ISS

A cup of ISSpresso

One thing ISS astronauts must have really missed was a cup of decent coffee – something impossible to make in the conditions of zero gravity.

But on Sunday the new international crew ferried to the International Space Station aboard a Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft. Among them was Italy’s first female astronaut, Samantha Cristoforetti, who brought a cherished 20-kilogram coffee machine, called the ISSpresso.

The final coffee product will not be served in a cup though – given the gravity restrictions – but piped into a sealed plastic pouch, from which the astronauts will have to drink it through a straw.

Famous coffee maker Lavazza which created the device along with engineering firm Argotec hopes the machine will become “a venue for getting together, chatting and relaxing: an aspect that should not be ignored in missions that keep the astronauts away from home for many months in a challenging environment.”

3D printing in space

A dream of self-sufficient civilization in space has come a step closer to reality when the zero-gravity 3D printer arrived to ISS in October.

The device, designed and manufactured by California-based start-up Made in Space, is expected to become a reliable piece of in-space technology. The capacities of the gadget are in fact limited only by the fantasy of the crew members. Among the things it can do are extruding streams of metal, plastic or other material and welding it layer by layer to produce three-dimensional objects.

“This experiment has been an advantageous first stepping stone to the future ability to manufacture a large portion of materials and equipment in space that has been traditionally launched from Earth surface, which will completely change our methods of exploration,” said Mike Snyder, Director of R&D at Made In Space.

‘Nice to meet you, people’: Cute robot joins ISS team

Last year the first robot astronaut joined the ISS team. Japanese scientist created Kirobo to accompany Koichi Wakata, the first Japanese commander of the International Space Station. Cute knee-high robot is capable of responding to human questions, without any pre-programmed responses.

"Good morning to every one of you people on Earth. I am robot astronaut Kirobo. I am the world's first talking robot astronaut. Nice to meet you," it said in Japanese upon arrival at the ISS.

On Christmas Day 2013 Kirobo was actively chatting with Wakata, saying that it would like a toy rocket from Santa Claus as a present.

Zero G not an obstacle to staying fit

Spaceflights have many negative effects on the human body. Muscle atrophy and deterioration of the skeleton are probably the most widespread health problems faced by the ISS crew. But scientists developed a weight lifting machine called the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED).

The astronauts will be able to perform squats, deadlifts and presses to reduce muscle and blood loss.

www.rt.com

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